Locative Audio

Location-based Media, an umbrella for Locative Audio, brings to composers the idea of customising and associating sonic ideas to a specific geolocation. Mobile technologies, such as the GPS smartphones employed for Locativeaudio.org project and custom made software provide the core tools for its realisation. These unique tools enable sound artists to apply locative audio and media technoogies to creative thinking and to take the results to our streets and own pockets as an extension and reinvention of the concert hall. By 'Augmenting the Aurality' of a specific every-day location, composers can recover memories of a particular place, can produce sonic alternatives to repositories of visual information; and even attempt to forecast desired futures through sound.

Kinesthesia

Kinesthesia (Bukvic, 2012) interactive aural installation explores human geospatial motion of multiple participants, whose cumulative actions form a subconsciously collaborative data stream devoid of time and space. The ensuing data stream was broadcast from Virginia (United States) to Manchester (United Kingdom) where it was reconstructed inside an autonomous meta-instrument and presented to an audience as a persistent spatially-aware installation.

Up to eight participants located in Virginia, USA broadcasted their relative GPS motion data (changes in their X and Y coordinates in respect to their global position) twice a second. This data was broadcasted via internet to the software installation running at NOVARS (Manchester University). There it was analyzed and metamorphosed into a soundscape consisting of three distinct elements: motion clicks, reverberant zither-like textures, and noisy vectors.

Each participant's click sound was assigned a random pitch. Clicks were spatialized among up to four speakers reflecting participants' relative changes in motion. As participants' motion increased, so did the clicks get louder and increase in frequency. When the participant's location reached the edge of a virtual rectangle depicted by the four speakers, its location was reflected to the opposite end of the rectangle.

In the event participant stopped moving, or got temporarily disconnected, the installation began spawning sporadic reverberant zither-like textures at user's last known location until participant's motion resumed.

Occasionally, the installation drew aural vectors, or lines depicted with noisy distorted material that connect relative positions between two participants whose motion was noticeable enough to spawn such an event.

Members: 
Name Department College
Ivica Ico Bukvic Music College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, Virginia Tech
Ricardo Climent   University of Manchester, NOVARS

Broadcast from Virginia (United States) to various locations around the world (Manchester UK, Valencia Spain, Perth Australia) with up to 8 particpants from Virginia

Collaborative Colleges: 
Liberal Arts & Human Sciences
Type: 
Software (Unique tools that enable sound artists to apply locative audio and media technoogies to creative thinking and to take the results to our streets and own pockets as an extension and reinvention of the concert hall)